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But first, hydrate

What's your number one skin priority?

Maybe you focus on getting clear skin, fading sun spots or preventing facial lines. Actually, its more like all of them!

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Non-comedogenic: fact or fiction?

Ever broken out from a non-comedogenic product before?

They are technically not supposed to clog pores. So why did the opposite happen?

The origins of comedogenicity
'Comedogenicity' is the ability for something to cause comedones or clogged pores . This concept came about in the 1970s to explain how acne can be caused by cosmetic products. 

The original study involved applying different ingredients on rabbit's ears and see if they caused comedones. The...

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Good Hair Day, Everyday

By Anita Scuderi, Adam & Eva Hairdressers
Don't wash too often. But when you do, wash it well.
Most clients wash their hair every day or every other day, which is too often! Ideally, you should be washing your hair once or twice a week! Your hair's natural oils are designed to condition and protect your hair, so when you shampoo daily, it removes these vital oils away.
To help stretch your regular wash out a day or two, double (or even triple!)...

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Marie Claire Feature

Marie Claire, The Smooth Operator feature in 'The Beauty Edit: Need to know'.
Printed for Australia Dec 2017.

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Woman's Day Feature

Woman's Day Magazine, 'The Rise of Customisable Beauty'.
Published 7 August 2017.

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The truth about dark and light

About 80% of the people I encounter struggle with hyperpigmentation.

It is difficult to resolve for many people as they don't understand it enough. They also find it confusing to navigate through products as they don't really know what works.

If this is you, keep reading!

Hyperpigmentation 101
Melanin gives our skin its natural colour. The dark spot or patch we see is a result...

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When less is more

The more active ingredients there are, the more effective the product is. Right?

Product ingredients are always listed in decreasing concentrations on the label. There is a common belief that a fantastic product should have all actives high up in the ingredients list (i.e. used in large amounts). When active ingredients appear at the bottom of the list, many people assume that the product won't be effective.
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Perception and Performance

Are thicker products better products? A decadent cream is superior than one that feels like nothing...right?
Actually, that's not true. Thickness, or texture, has more to do with our perception, than the actual effectiveness of a product.

What gives a product thickness?

A specific group of ingredients are responsible for imparting thickness to products. Different types and combinations will result in different thickness and textures, which are sometimes important for categorising various types of products (more on that later).
Nearly all products...

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Our favourite ingredient

Out of all ingredients I use, there is one that I love the most.

Actually it is a group of them called humectants. What are they and what makes them so special?

The power of humectants
All humectants have one thing in common. They attract water to themselves.
When we use humectants on our skin, they attract water from their surroundings, resulting in an increase in the amount of water on our skin surface....

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Through thick & thin III: Why different product textures exist

Recap: Thickeners (or rheology modifiers) give products their thickness.
Combining different types and amounts results in products of varying consistencies. Why create different textures?

For that luxurious feel
Heavy creams have long been associated with luxury. Playing on this psychology many of us have, lots of signature products from high-end brands are purposefully formulated to be thick and rich.

Prevent evaporation to retain moisture
Thick moisturisers have a high content of thickeners (particularly fatty alcohols and waxes), giving a high degree...

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Through thick & thin II: What gives products consistency?

Recap: Product thickness does not reflect effectiveness.

What actually contributes to the thickness of a product? They are a specific group of ingredients called rheology modifiers or known to most as ‘thickeners’.
Nearly all formulated products will contain rheology modifiers. They can be categorised into 2 groups, depending on what they can thicken.

Oil thickeners
Oil thickeners thicken the oil component of any lotions/creams (which can exist as cleansers, moisturisers or masks) and waterless-balms. They are typically solid, waxy substances at...

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Through thick & thin I: Are thicker products better?

Premium skincare products are often portrayed as thick and lavish. These physical characteristics therefore become psychologically associated with quality, which is probably one of the reasons why many people tend to prefer thick and heavy creams.
However, this is not necessarily the case. Let me explain why.

Actives and Viscosity
The first thing to realise is that most actives do not add 'body' to products. Let’s take a look at some actives that we are familiar with.

AHAs, amino...

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BeautyCrew Feature

BeautyCrew feature, 'The best ingredients for treating pigmentation'.
Published 23 May 2018

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Beauty Crew Feature

BeautyCrew feature, 'How long it takes for your acne products to work'.
Published 20 May 2018

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Instyle Feature

InStyle feature, 'How to: Personalise Your Skincare Regime'.
Published 16 May 2018

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Beautycrew Feature

Beautycrew Feature, 'How long it takes for wrinkles to disappear'.
Published 20 April 2018

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Moisturising FAQs

Why do moisturisers break me out? Are hyaluronic acid products the best at hydration?
Today we're answering everything to do with moisturising.

Why do most moisturisers break me out?
These moisturisers contain oils/emollients unsuitable for you. These ingredients are often waxy or solid at room temperatures, giving a nice, smooth consistency. However, they can result in clogged pores for some people. Common examples are cetearyl alcohol, beeswax and shea butter.

Are thick moisturisers best for dry skins?
No. A thick product might...

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The Making of A Moisturiser

Moisturisation is achieved through humectants and emollients.
Thus, they play a big role in how well moisturisers perform.

Types of humectants and emollients
Humectants attracts water; emollients reduce water loss. The figure below illustrates some examples.



How do we pick which (and how much) to use from so many choices? For humectants, it mostly comes down to compatibility with other ingredients in the formula, but emollient selection requires more consideration.

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Beautycrew Feature

Beautycrew Feature, 'The ingredients every rosacea sufferer needs in their skin care'.
Published 6 April 2018

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Beauty Breakdown - Moisturise

Why is moisturising essential?
Because moisturisation increases water content, making it imperative for all skins types, even the oiliest.

Water and skin health
Skin is a protective barrier against water loss and harmful pathogens, through a film called the acid mantle.
The acid mantle is a mixture of our natural skin oils, sweat and natural moisturising factors (NMF; think of it as skin's natural humectants) in water. Thus, water is crucial in maintaining the strength of the barrier to

...

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